Important issues with resumes

R É S U M É B A S I C S
Length One page in length is recommended for most college students, although
you can have two pages of important information.
Be as concise as you can, but don’t leave out the essentials.
Margins Between 1” and ½” for all margins (Word annoyingly defaults to 1.25”)
Type size 10-12 point font
Font Use a simple font that is easy to read.
(Examples are Arial, Tahoma, Times New Roman or Verdana)
Style Use the Tab key (on the keyboard) and Indent button (on the toolbar)
instead of the space bar to move & align text (to line it up exactly).
Write out all words completely (like: Street, Bachelor of Arts, Ohio,
September, etc.). It looks nicer and it’s easier to read.
Paper Plain, heavyweight (24#) résumé paper, white or light beige.
Print quality Use laser printing, or a very high quality photocopy. No ink jet. When
emailing your resume, send it as a PDF (see last page for details)
Sequence Most important items first (EDUCATION if you are still in school or recently
graduated; EXPERIENCE if you have significant relevant experience)
Spell-check ALL CAPS are not checked; change settings or check them yourself.
In general, use spell-check, but don’t trust it; “a part” and “apart” are
spelled correctly, but one space gives them opposite meanings!© 2013 Eric R. Anderson, Capital University
4
I D E N T I F Y I N G I N F O R M A T I O N
Name*
Address
City, State Zip Code
Telephone number
E-mail address
It is important to provide all of this information to a prospective employer. It is always placed
at the top of the résumé, in one of a number of styles. If you basically have one address,
you’ll typically center it at the top of the page.
KIM COLLEGE
354 Cowtown Lane
Columbus, Ohio 43215
(513) 555-5588
kcollege@capital.edu
Sometimes it makes sense to list two addresses. For example, if you’re applying for a
summer internship close to the end of the semester. However, only include one email
address and be sure to remove the email “hyperlink” on your printed résumé.
KIM COLLEGE
Address until May 10: Address after May 10:
Box 999, Capital University 354 Intelligence Lane
Columbus, Ohio 43209 Mensa, Ohio 44339
(614) 236-1234 (513) 555-5588
kcollege@capital.edu
If your only phone number is your cell phone, you can also list the contact info like this:
KIM COLLEGE
(513) 555-5588
kcollege@capital.edu
Address until May 10: Address after May 10:
Box 999, Capital University 354 Intelligence Lane
Columbus, Ohio 43209 Mensa, Ohio 44339
*Note: Be sure to make
your name a little
larger so it stands out
to the employer.© 2013 Eric R. Anderson, Capital University
5
O B J E C T I V E
Most employers want an objective on a résumé. It is a guiding statement that helps them
direct the résumé to the appropriate person, for the appropriate job, while giving your
résumé a focus. It should be a short, succinct description of the type of position(s) you are
currently seeking. It is best if your goals are defined well enough for an objective. One of
the most difficult tasks in writing the objective is balancing your statement between being
too specific and too broad.
In order to write a good objective:
 Tell the employer the field(s) of work for which you want to be considered. You can
specify by job function (librarian, social worker, etc.), or by work area (finance, public
relations, production, etc.).
 Give the employer any other guidelines that will help them get a grasp of your areas of
interest. Take a look at these examples:
FULL-TIME POSITIONS:
An organic or analytical chemistry position
A middle childhood teaching position in central Ohio
A position in the social service field, with a concentration in care for the elderly
A position in physical education at the high school level
A position in the field of criminal justice, focusing on theft prevention
An entry-level position in sales
INTERNSHIPS:
A human services internship
To develop my skills in the field of psychology through an internship
An internship or part-time job in which I can develop my accounting skills
If you absolutely can’t focus on a narrow range of work fields or if you are distributing your
résumé at a job fair or career fair, you can omit the objective, but you will be less marketable
if you are unsure of your goals. A good, well thought-out objective can make you a stronger
candidate. It will help you organize your résumé and your thoughts for an interview. If
you’re having trouble with this, come to Career Development for help.© 2013 Eric R. Anderson, Capital University
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E D U C A T I O N
If you are currently in college, you will most likely want to place this section immediately after
the OBJECTIVE. An exception to this might be a student who has significant experience that
is applicable to a career. After you have post-bachelor’s degree experience in your field, your
EXPERIENCE will be placed after the OBJECTIVE.
Also, you should generally include only those schools from which you have received a degree.
There are exceptions to this rule, like a school at which you were particularly active and
involved. List your highest degree first.
Finally, if you are a traditional first-year or a first semester sophomore student, you can
include your high school information.
EDUCATION CAPITAL UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio
Bachelor of Arts, May 2013
Major: English
Minor: Marketing
GPA: 3.12/4.00
The use of bold lettering and CAPITAL LETTERS (or italics) makes the information much
easier to read, and easier to skim.
Also, starting all useful information from the left side of the column is helpful.
STUDY ABROAD experience:
List it after your Capital University information, in the same format.
UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY, Sydney, Australia
Study Abroad Natural Resources Program, spring semester 2013
GPA: 3.02/4.00
Q: Why do we add the “/4.00″
to X.XX/4.00″?
A: It indicates the scale upon
which your GPA is based.© 2013 Eric R. Anderson, Capital University
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THE ISSUE OF G.P.A.: Should you include it?
There are several issues to consider here. Lots of employers like to see a 3.0 or higher. On
the other hand, the average college GPA is around 2.7. If yours is near that number, then you
might want to include it. If you don’t include your GPA, some employers may wonder exactly
how terrible it was, and you will leave it to their imagination. If your GPA is below what
anyone can imagine, perhaps you should leave it off.
There are some other ways to illustrate your academic performance:
Major GPA: (GPA in your major courses only)
GPA during last two years: (if you got your head on straight during your junior year)
HOW TO CALCULATE your Major GPA:
 Using only the courses from your major area, record the number of credit hours for each
and also convert the letter grades to points using the list below.
 Multiply number of credits by points for each class
 Add all points in one column and all credits in another
 Divide total points by total number of credits.
Credits Grade Points
4 A (4) 16
3 B (3) 9
3 B-
(2.67)
8.01
2 C (2) 4
12 37.01
Grades used in computing GPA:
Grade Points
A 4.0
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.0
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.0
F you guess
In the example on the left, the student has taken four
classes totaling 12 Credit Hours. Based on the
numerical value of each grade, the total Points equals
37.01.
To find the grade point average for these four classes,
we divide the Points by the Credits (37.01 /12).
The major GPA = 3.08.© 2013 Eric R. Anderson, Capital University
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E X P E R I E N C E
In this section you can include employment, internships, academic credit experiences, etc.
Use a section title to group your experiences by relevance:
EXPERIENCE Or, if it’s all in your major:
CAREER RELATED EXPERIENCE SOCIAL WORK EXPERIENCE
RELEVANT EXPERIENCE PUBLIC RELATIONS EXPERIENCE
ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCE
Within sections, experiences must be in reverse chronological order (most recent first).
Notes:
Volunteer Experience does not necessarily have to be in its own separate section. For
example, volunteer experiences could be Career Related, Relevant, Additional, etc.
The word Employment implies that you were paid. This is usually not the most important
issue to emphasize.
THE HEADING
In the heading of each experience, you will include your title or position, the period of time
that you worked, and your place of employment. If you didn’t have a title (